Did you know the Sago Palm is toxic to pets?

676138.jpg I just received a new edition of my ASPCA newsletter and one article in particular caught my eye. It was about the increased incidence of pets being poisoned by the Sago Palm. This plant can also be quite toxic to young children.

The Sago Palm is common in warm climates, but it’s become more popular in Northern homes as a houseplant. The plant is native to Southern Japan. It’s an attractive plant with dark green leaves and a hairy trunk.

Since 2003, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center has seen an increase in cases of Sago palm and Cycad poisonings by more than 200 percent. APCC data also reveals that 50 percent to 75 percent of those cases resulted in fatalities.

sago-palm.jpg A chemical in the plant called cycasin is toxic and often causes permanent liver damage as well as neurological damage if enough of the poison is absorbed by the body. The seeds are the most poisonous part of the plant, although all parts of this plant are toxic, and the effects on humans are seizures, coma and death. Of course the seeds are an attractive reddish color so children and possible curious pets might be drawn to the plant.

Clinical signs of toxic poisoning are vomiting, melena (blood in stool), Jaundice, increased thirst, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruising and later liver damage, liver failure and death.

If you have young children or pets in your home and you’d like to check to see if your house or garden plants are toxic you can take a look at this list of Toxic Plants. There’s also a list of non-toxic plants that you might also want to look at if you are planning on adding more plants to your collection.






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Create lists of plants you’ve grown or garden to do lists on Meosphere

I just joined an interesting site called Meosphere. The site is a collection of lists, and links that site members have created. Each member can create their own Meosphere.

As the sites about page says we all have our Meosphere. You could even say this blog has it’s own meosphere, a gardening meosphere perhaps.

The best way to explain this site to you is to show you.

I went looking for gardening related items and I found a Meosphere list had had already been started. It’s called “Flowers You’ve grown”. I went through the list and ticked off all the flowers on the list that I’ve grown at some point in my life or that are currently growing in my garden. Then I saved a list of the flowers I’ve grown as my own list. I can’t find an embed list link for my own list though so I’ll just paste the first list here to show you:

Now we all know that even more flowers could be added to that list but that’s the beauty of the meosphere lists. You can place a check mark beside all the flowers on this list that you grow and save your own copy of the list. Then you can add even more flowers to it if you’d like. You can even edit your saved list to add descriptions and photos of each item.

Can you see the possibilities?

I think I may spend a bit of time on Meosphere later today. I might create some gardening to do lists. You know, specific spring, summer, and autumn gardening tasks for Zone 5b gardeners. Others on the site can find my lists and make their own copies adding tasks specific to their own gardening zones. You could also make lists of your gardening books, favorite garden tools, and so on. I love it.

You could make lists of just about anything in this manner and since we’re bloggers it could be yet another way to interact with our readers.

Please do feel free to check off the flowers that you grow on this list and make your own list out of it. I’d love to visit your meospheres to see what you’ve created and see lists of what you’ve been growing.

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